Stay Curious.
Dig Deeper.
Nurture What Matters.
Be BoldHeart.
Enjoy Your Life.

Welcome to BoldHeartMama!
Join my mailing list for updates!

Welcome BoldHeartMamas! Join my mailing list for updates.

* indicates required

 photo FACEFOLLOW_zpstjpvifnc.png
The BoldHeartMama desires to enjoy living out the choices that she’s made for herself and for her family. She is a relentless learner: curious, inquisitive, and open to the possibilities of her life and of the human condition. She understands that there isn't one right way—she asks questions that dig deeper to make sense of it all and to find her own path.

She pays attention to and nurtures whatever it is she really cares about, letting go of the rest (for now) knowing she can't do and be everything all at once. She embraces her imperfections in favor of "good enough"—her imperfect self, her imperfect home, her imperfect mothering, her imperfect desires—and she never stops evolving as a woman and mother. She is a BoldHeart, authentic and true to herself.

The BoldHeartMama knows there is only this one life and she's all in. She is present and engaged and making things happen. Her intuition is her guide. She seeks to be inspired and relies on her creativity and her resourcefulness to solve the big and little challenges that she and her family face together as they navigate their relationships and their world.

The BoldHeartMama is willing to take calculated risks to make her biggest dreams come true. She is living out her BoldHeart in the moment, making small moves and taking little steps that add up, and she's cultivating a good life for herself and her family in the process. Read More!

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

It's been too long



Instead of sinking into the couch cushions to tap out the highlights of our days together, after dinner each night I lay quietly and read for a while as I nurse Merritt to sleep, the sunlight fading until I can't see the words on the page. Many nights the darkness is my cue to call it a day too. If there's anything truly worth doing at the end of a long, long day, it is to go to bed early. Other nights, I slip away from my little Merritt boy and head up to the loft to catch up on work email or to finally look my husband in the eye and have a grown up conversation. There are far too few hours in the day.

So much is happening around here that living in the moment has just been easier than trying to find time to document with photos and narrative. I miss the time that I used to carve out for my blog each night. The writing always feels good, and it's unreal how a few days turn into a week (or two!) and I find myself with way, way more to say than I know I'll ever find time to get down. Just gotta keep moving forward!

The weekends have been crammed with trips to the farmer's market, day visits to Richmond for house hunting, and family naps. If our house selling experiment goes through we're looking to close in mid to late October. I have yet to fully embrace the reality of the effort required to pack up and move all of our belongings. I think I'm in denial.

I've read at least 20 books since June began (many thanks to Merritt's sleep routine). We've been so inspired by the words of Michael Pollan, Nina Plank, Barbara Kingsolver, and Alice Waters. What began as a mother's day project in the backyard has, in the course of one summer, completely changed the way we eat and redefined our relationship with the food that we bring to our table. It's been a quiet revolution. My former relationship with food might have been characterized as mediocre, at best. In forging real life relationships with our food, through the people who grow and raise it, we've found our place within our local food chain. I thought I loved food before, but I think now that I'm in love.

The kids and I have been traversing our county during the week to forage for local food dealers, and pick your own fruit farms. I've been thrilled and impressed with what we've found so close to home.

Has your Summer reading inspired you in any way?

3 comments :

  1. I think we should all take a cue from you and live in the moment with our children. Too many days have gone by with my thoughts occupied by online projects or rather useless things while Lillian just plays around me. It's time to pare down to priorities and enjoy our little ones and pick up on other hobbies later....I read Nina Plank's Real Food a few years ago and I should pull it out again and reread it. She is a Grass-fed meat advocate and has a lot of interesting things to say about Saturated Fats from animal sources. For contrast I really, really enjoyed Dr. Fuhrman's, "Eat to Live" which is more of a plant-based diet and I read that last summer. I take Dr. Fuhrman's advice and apply it to how I personally care to make food choices. His philosophies, however, focus on disease/ cancer prevention... what he calls a "nutritarian" diet. http://www.drfuhrman.com/

    Other than that I have only successfuly finished a couple Elizabeth Pantley books...and a book on Christian Spirituality called Anonymous by Alicia Britt Chole. It is one my favorite books.

    Even though I would like to see you more often on your blog...I hope you have a wonderful time enjoying your family as it is :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ahhh Sophie! Addie June is noming on her Sophie full force these days!
    I know EXACTLY how you feel about the unintentional blogging hiatus. I don't know if it's a summer thing or what, but our days have been so busy (and fun!) that I feel that I've lost touch with my little "inter-web world". I still try to post at least once a week, mainly to document something about what we have been up to this summer, but I used to really LOVE reading my blog list, and I still do, I suppose, I just haven't had the time. I feel kind of guilty about it though. Silly, right?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well you know we want you to post something if we are reading your comment thread ;)....no pressure! And I agree wholeheartedly with you. Any animal food products I would consider truly natural and wholesome would have been feed a natural diet in a healthy, natural env't. Dr. Furhman's approach would probably make most sense when there isn't access to meat you would want to eat. Better a plate full of veggies and non animal protein than chicken from who-knows where and cheese made out of who-knows what ;) So if you can't afford good nutrition-rich meat, don't eat meat(?) (Makes me nervous about dining-out!)

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...